Translation of clover - Dictionary : English-Ojibwe

clover

How do you say clover in Ojibwe? We have searched for you the available information in the English-Ojibwe dictionary. You may find below, if available, not only the translation of clover, but also common expressions and phrases, as well as definitions, to help you better understand how to use it. For many verbs you may find detailed information regarding the conjugation.

Translation
We have found the following translations for clover in Ojibwe:
clover
nesibag+ag
clover
nesoobagak+in
In addition to the English-Ojibwe dictionary, which was the starting point for this page while looking for 'clover', an Ojibwe-English dictionary is also available. The two are closely interconnected, being able to be switched by simple clicks. They contain many common expressions and phrases, a wide variety of terms from different fields of activity are included to help you better understand how to use them. Give them a try!

Expressions Top
Here are the available expressions containing clover in Ojibwe:
Clover Hay Creek
Mashkosiwi-ziibiins
clover leaf
nesibag aniibish+an
clover: red ~
nisoobag+oon ezhi-wadong+in
clover: white ~
nisoobag+oon
prairie-clover: purple ~
baasibagak+ig
red clover
nisoobag+oon ezhi-wadong+in
white clover
nisoobag+oon
Definition Top
  1. (anagram) velcro
  2. clovers: small plant with three leaves
  3. clovers: Any legume of the genus Trifolium, composed of 300 or more annual and perennial species, found in most temperate and subtropical regions. The alternate, compound leaves usually have three toothed leaflets. The very small, fragrant flowers are crowded into dense heads. Clovers are highly palatable to livestock and high in protein, phosphorus and calcium, thus providing valuable nourishment in the form of hay, pasture and silage. They also improve and conserve soil by adding nitrogen and increasing the availability of other nutrients for crops that follow. The most important agricultural species are red clover (T. pratense), white clover (T. repens) and alsike clover (T. hybridum).; Clover (Trifolium); Ken Brate; Photo Researchers
  4. any member of the genus Trifolium, of the pea family (Fabaceae), comprising 300 or more annual and perennial species, occurring in most temperate and subtropical regions (except Southeast Asia and Australia). The alternate leaves are compound, usually with three toothed leaflets. The very small, fragrant flowers are crowded into dense heads or spikes. The small, dry fruit usually contains one or two seeds. Cultivated species of clover originated in the Old World but have become naturalized worldwide in temperate regions. Clover is highly palatable to livestock and is high in protein, phosphorus and calcium, thus providing valuable nourishment in either the green or the dry stage. In addition to their principal value as animal feed in the form of hay, pasture and silage, the clovers are valuable soil-improving and soil-conserving plants. Clover adds about 55170 kg per hectare (about 50150 pounds per acre) of nitrogen to the soil and increases availability of other nutrients for following crops. The most important agricultural species are red clover (T. pratense), white clover (T. repens) and alsike clover (T. hybridum). Red clover, a biennial or short-lived perennial, bears an oval, purplish flower head about 2.5 cm (1 inch) in diameter. White clover, a low, creeping perennial, is often used in lawn-grass mixtures and bears a white flower head often tinged with pink. Alsike clover, a perennial species sometimes called Swedish clover or Alsatian clover, bears globular, rosy-pink flower heads.
  5. (n) a small plant with three round, green leaves often fed to cows See picture: Flowers and plants To live/be in clover is to enjoy a life of wealth and comfort.